Курсова робота

The importance of listening

Plan

I. Introduction.

II. The main part:

1. Tapescript.

2. Transcription.

3. Exercises.

III. Vocabulary work: synonyms, antonyms, word families.

IV. Conclusion.

The importance of listening

Begin by establishing the importance of listening:

— We cannot develop speaking skills unless we also develop listening
skills; to have a successful conversation. Students must understand what
is said to them. Later, the ability to understand spoken English may
become very important (for listening to the radio, understanding foreign
visitors, studying, etc.). To develop this ability, students need plenty
of practice in listening to English spoken at normal speed.

— Listening to spoken English is an important way of acquiring the
language – of ‘picking up’ structures and vocabulary. In a situation
where learners are living in a country where English is the first
language, they plenty of ‘exposure’ to the language – they hear it all
the time, and can acquire it more easily than learners who do not hear
English spoken around them. So it need to give these learners as much
apportunity to listen to spoken English as possible.

In class, we are usually concerned with ‘Focussed’ listening: we listen
for a particular purpose, to find out information we need to know.
Examples of this kind of listening are: listening to a piece of
important news on the radio; listening to someone explaining how to
operate a machine. In these situations, we listen much more closely; but
we do not listen to everything we hear with equal concentration – we
listen for the most important points or for particular information.
Usually, we know beforehand what we are listening for (the things we
want to know), and this helps us to listen.

The debate about the use of authentic listening material is just as
fierce in listening material is just as fierce in listening as it is in
reading. If, for example, we play a tape of a political speech to
complete beginners, they won’t understand a word. You could argue that
such a tape would at least give them a feel for the sound of the
language, but beyond that it is difficult to see what they would get out
of it. If, on the other hand, we give them a realistic (though not
authentic) tape of a telephone conversation, they may learn much more
about the language – and start to gain confidence as a result.

Everything depends on level, and the kind of tasks that go with a tape.
There may well be some authentic material which is usable by beginners
such as pre-recorded announcements, telephone messages etc. More
difficult material may be appropriate for elementary students provided
that the questions they are asked do not demand detailed understanding.
Advanced students may benefit from scripted material provided that it is
interesting and subtle enough – and provided the tasks that go with it
are appropriate for their level.

Since, as it was said, listening to tapes is a way of bringing
different. Kinds of speaking into the classroom, it is wanted to play
different kinds of tape to them, e.g. announcements, conversations,
telephone exchanges, leetures, interviews, other radio programmes,
stories read aloud etc.

Tape programme to corposy indirections to:

A listening speaking skills book. Second adition by Judis Tuka.

Chapter 1. Education and student plays.

Part 1. Phonological clubs. Page 2.

Context: A following conversation between an American teacher and a
foreign student takes place on the college campas. This is there first
meaning.

Pre-reading questions:

Where do you think they are going?

Who will start the conversation?

What time of year is it?

Is anything else you would like to know about them?

Getting the main idea.

A. Listen to the conversation. Listen to the main ideas only.

— Excuse me. Could you tell me where Camble Hall is?

— Oh, you mean Camble Hall?

— Yes, that’s right.

— It’s right to be there. I am going there too. Are you taking an
English placement test?

— Yes, I am. How about you?

— I am going to be as an English teacher this year.

— Oh, really? Maybe I will be in your class.

— Gloria Sanchals.

— My name is Linda. Are you from South America?

— Yes, I am from Venesuella.

— Have you been here long?

— I’ve been here since August.

— Is that all? Your English is grate.

— My family used to come here every summer when I was small. Now I want
to go to college here.

— What do you want to study?

— I am interested in business, administration.

— I see. We have to take it awful.

— What?

— The test of English, as a foreign language. It’s awful.

— Oh, right. Yes, that’s way I came to this school.

— Well, here is Camble Hall. Good luck on a placement exam. Meybe I’ll
see you in class.

— Thank’s. I hope so.

B. Diskuss the entrance to the pre-reading questions. When your
predications correct? What do you remember about Gloria and Linda.

Stress.

C. In spoken English important words – words that carry information, are
usually stressed. This means they are high piched, louder, pronounced
more clearly.

Listen to the conversation again and fill in the missing stressed words.

— Exuse me. Could you tell me where Camble Hall is?

— Oh, you mean Camble Hall?

— Yes, that’s tight.

— It’s right to be there. I am going there too. Are you taking an
English placement test?

— Yes, I am. How about you?

— I am going as English teacher this year.

— Oh really. Maybe I’ll be in your class.

— It’s possible. What’s your name?

— Gloria Sanchals.

— My name is Linda. Are you from South America?

— Yes, I’m from Venesuella.

— Have you been here long?

— I’ve been here since August.

— Is that all? Your English is grate.

My family used to come here every summer when I was small. Now I want to
go to college here.

— What do you want to study?

— I’m interested in business administration.

— I see we are have to take it awful.

— What?

— The test of English as a foreign language, It’s awful.

— Oh, right. Yes, that’s way I came to this school.

— Well, here is Camble Hall. Good luck on a placement exam. Meybe I’ll
see you in class.

— Thank’s. I hope so.

D. Now listen again, repeat it sedness after the speaker. Remember,
stressed words are louder and clearer than unstressed words.

Redactions.

E. In spoken English the words that are not stressed are often shoten or
redused. For example:

“Could you tell me where Cabme Hall is” changes to could you tell me
where Cambe Hall is. Listen to the deggerense: long – could you

short – could you

There are several examples of redused in the conversation you’d just
heart. Listen to these examples of long and short forms and repeat the
short form after the speaker:

— Oh, you mean Camble Hall?

— How about you?

— I’m going to be as English teacher this year.

— What’s your name?

— My family used to come here every summer.

— Now I want to go to college here.

— Would you have to take that awful?

F. Listen to the redaction in the following conversation between a
foreign student and school secretary. Write the long form in the blank.

— Could you help me?

— I used to be one of the students here.

— I want to get application to that awful test.

— You mean the one of November.

— Let’s see. The application is used to be on this shelf.

— They books like the old gone you probably have to wait until the next
week.

— How about the surname one when they come in.

— Sure. What’s you name and address.

Part 2. Lecture. Page 6.

Context: Gloria goes too orientations meaning for foreign students. At
the lecture the speaker spovides information about typical college and
university courses in USA and Kanada.

Pre-reading questions:

What you already know about college course in this country. Think on
topics such as exams, class size, student-teacher relationships, grades,
etc.

Vocabulary. The following terms appear in the lecture. You may learn
their meaning before you listen to, or you may use the context of the
lecture. After the lecture you definitions of some terms. First repeat
the words after the speaker: skadual, Undergraduate, lecture,
discussional section, teaching, assistant, experiment, technagarin,
midterm exam, final exam, quess, objective question, essay question,
research paper.

A. Listen to the lecture. Take short notes on the most important points.

Since many of you are planning to study at the college or university in
this country. You maybe querase to know what a typical college course is
like. What can you expect to do when a typical week is, how many exams
will you have, will you have to do a lot of writing, what should you do
when you have any problems. These are the questions I want to discuss
with you today First let’s talk about what your weekly skadual will look
like. If you are an undergraduate in any field or madder you can expect
to spend between four and six hours a week for each class attending
lectures, no matter what your madder will be. Lectures are usually in
very large rooms, because undergraduate courses such as introduction to
psychology or economics often have two or three hundred students,
especially in large universities. In lectures it’s very important for
you to take notes on what the professor says, because the information in
a lecture is often different from the information in your textbooks.
Also you can expect to have exam, questions based on the lectures. So it
isn’t enough just read your textbook. You have to attend lectures as
well. In a typical week you will also for every class you take. The
discussion section – is mall proupe meeting, usually within thirty
students, where you can ask questions about the lecture, the reading and
the homework. In large universities graduate usually you cand-act
discussion section. If your madder is chemistry or physics or another
science, you also have to spend several hours a week in a lab or
laboratory doing experiments. This means that science madder spend more
time in a classroom than nonscience madders do. On the other hand,
people, who made subject like literature or anthropology usually have to
read and to write more than science madders do. Now I’d like to go on
and say a few words about examinations. Most universities courses have
at least two exams: one in the middle of the quarter called a midterm,
and one at the end, called the final exam. Most courses also have
vocasional quises wich are smaller test given every week or two. There
are two basic type of the exam questions. There are objective questions
such as motofol choise, true or false, maching or filling in the blank,
and essay questions, when you must write an essay or composition in
respond to a question. Most exams, are combination of essay and
objective questions. In so me courses, especially in nonscience one, you
might also have to write a research paper. A research paper is a writing
project in wich you shoos the topic related to the course, go to the
library read, several articles and then write a paper about what you
have read. You can see that the ability to write is extremely important
in American universities. The final point that I want to cover today is
what you should do when you need help, in a particular class. If you are
having a problem you should make an appointment to see your instructor
immediately, don’t be shy. Instructors see the students in their offises
during office hours. Instructor will almost always announce their office
hours at the first clees meeting. You can also make a special
appointment to see your instructor if you can’t go to his or her regular
offise hourse. I might add that it’s a good idea to make an appointment
to see your instructor even if you don’t have a particular problem. That
way you would be easier if you will nesed special help later on.

So far I talked about college courses structure, about exams, about
research papers and about getting help if you need it. Let’s stop here
and see if there any questions.

B. Listen again. Add more information to your notes. Then use your notes
to dill in your blank.

Part 3. Making influences. Page 9.

The following short conversations take place on the college campas.
After each conversation you will have a question sircle the correct
answer and listen to the conversation again.

This time you will here the correct answer.

— Oh, I’m nervous. This turn papers is doing two days. All the books I
need are in checkout.

— I know what you mean. There are a million books in this place and I
can never find what I need.

1. Where are the speakers?

— Oh, I’m nervous. This turn papers is doing two days. All the books I
need are in checkout.

— I know what you mean. There are a million books in this place and I
can never find what I need.

1. Where are the speakers?

— Maybe I’ll try the other library.

— Can I see you sometime this week?

— Sure. What about?

— I don’t understand this week’s chemistry experiment.

— Did you come to the lab yesterday?

— Yes, but I was late and I’ve missed a past of your explanation.

2. Who is the student probably talking to?

— Can I see you sometime this week?

— Sure. What about?

— I don’t understand this week’s chemistry experiment.

— Did you come to the lab yesterday?

Yes, but I was late and I’ve missed a part of your explanation.

2. Who is the student probably talking to?

— Ok, come to the teaching office tomorrow around one o’clock.

— What is the reglaiments for the course?

— There will be weekly quises and the final exam. You have to go to
language lab two hours a week and of course your attendance and class
participation are very important.

3. What kind of class is this probably?

— What is the reglaiments for the course?

— There will be weekly quises and the final exam. You have to go to
language lab two hours a week and of course your attendance and class
participation are very important.

3. What kind of class is this probably?

— Oh, and in the end of quarter each personal give an oral raport in
German.

— Hello!

— Hi, Katy! This is Ron from your history class.

— Oh, hi!

— Listen, I was wondering. Am …

Were you planning to go to Alis party in Saturday?

— Am… I haven’t really thought about it yet.

— Well, would you like to go?

— You mean with you?

— Yes.

4. How does the woman feel about the invitation?

— Sure, I’d like to go.

— Hello!

— Hi, Katy! This is Ron from your history class.

— Oh, hi!

— Listen. I was wondering. Am…

— Were you planning to go to Alis party in Saturday?

— Am… I haven’t really thought about it yet.

— Well, would you like to go?

— You mean with you?

— Yes.

5. How does the woman fell about the invitation?

— Well, sank’s, but I’m busy that night.

Part 4. Listening tests. Page 9.

A. Listen to the following telephone conversation between foreign
student and a college consular. Compeat their application form using the
information in the converdation.

— What’s your lees name?

— You mean firname?

— Yes.

— Abatelli.

— First name?

— Surgio.

— Do you have a mild name?

— No.

— What’s your telephone number?

— g 382136.

— And your grown middling address?

— Excuse me?

— Your address you live in town, where you are live now.

— Oh, 3440 Heelstreat.

— What that 14 or 40?

— Oh 40, Colombus Ohio 43210.

— Date of birth.

— May 2, 1965.

— Country of birth.

— So you are a sitizen of the Right?

— Right.

— All right, Surgio, what type of visa do you have?

— F1.

— What does it expire?

— In June.

— Ok, this is the last question Surgio – who advise you to a programme?

— I don’t understand.

— Who told you about the English language centure?

— Oh, my friend studied hier last year.

B. Look at the map of the college compass. Find the coffeteria. Linda is
seating outside the coffeteria when some students approaching aske the
direction. Listen to the direction Linda gives. Then write the names of
the buildings you hear on the map.

— Excuse me, what’s way the Student’s Union?

— Oh, it’s on Lection Drive, just one tour the lake and turn left on
Lection – it’s a large building on your right.

— Thank you.

— Excuse me, how can I get to the computer lab?

— The computer lab? Hm… Let me see. I am preaty sure it’s in the
computer science building. Do you know where are this?

— No.

— Ok. Go gross the street towards the park and continua down the Bridge
road until you reach Breadford, turn right on Breadford. After you pass
college bulwar, just see on your left.

— Let’s see. I go down the Brodge road, turn right, then go straight.

— Aha.

— Thanks.

— Hi, Gloria, you look lost.

— I am. A am trying to find the language lab.

— It’s on the North side. Do you know where the business hall is?

— Yes a Campas road, right?

— Right, where Campas road and Joan street meet. Where the language lab
is, cross the street for the business hall.

It’s on the Bread for avenue.

— I get it, sank’s a lot.

Exercises.

Exercise 1.

Write questions to which the bold type words are the answers.

1) Gloria Sanchals looks for Camble Hall. Who looks for Camble Hall?

2) Linda shows the way for Gloria.

3) Gloria is from Venesuella.

4) Glorias family used to come to USA when she was small.

5) Gloria is interested in business administration.

6) Linda hope to see Gloria in class.

Exercise 2.

Look at the table and write sentences as in the example:

Gloria Linda

Go to Camble Hall

Gloria goes to Camble Hall. So does Linda.

Know where camble Hall is

Interested in business administration

Come from Venesuela

Going to be as English teacher

Taking an English placement test

Hope to see again

Exercise 3.

Put the verbs in brackets into the correct form.

1. Gloria (look for) Camble Hall now.

2. Gloria (meet) Linda just.

3. Linda (know) were Camble Hall is.

4. Linda and Gloria (go) together to Camble Hall.

5. Gloria (come) here from Venesuella.

6. Gloria (be) here since August.

7. Gloria’s parents (come) here when she was small.

8. Gloria (take) here placement test.

9. Gloria (study) a business administration if she pass her test.

Exercise 4.

Say true or false.

Gloria are looking for Camble Hall.

She met a boy.

Linda is going to Camble Hall too.

Gloria is from Venesuella.

Gloria is from Europe.

Linda is going to be es an English teacher.

Linda have to pass test from English.

Gloria have a test of English, as a foreign language.

Exercise 5.

Choose the correct answer.

1. Gloria met…

a) a boy; b) Linda; c) a girl; d) a friend.

2. Linda is…

a) a teacher; b) a student; c) a friend; d) a pupil.

3. Gloria’s surname is…

a) Smith; b) Brown; c) Sanchals; d) Baxton.

4. Gloria came from…

a) Europe; b) Kanada; c) Africa; d) Venesuella.

5. Gloria’s English is…

a) awful; b) not bad; c) good; d) grate.

6. Gloria is going to study…

a) business administration; b) teaching; c) law; d) cooking.

Exercise 6.

Answer the questions.

Who is the story about?

What is Gloria’s surname?

Where is the going?

Gloria met Linda, didn’t she?

What did she get to know about Linda?

Does Linda know where Camble Hall is?

Is Gloria’s English perfect or not?

Is Gloria interested in business administration?

Exercise 7.

Translate into English.

Глорія запитує де знаходить Кембл Хол.

Глорія тільки що зустріла Лінду.

Лінда йде туди ж, куди й Глорія.

Не будучи в США довго, Глорія чудово володіє англійською.

Глорія має намір вступити в коледж.

Лінда повідомляє Глорії про тест з англійської.

Можливо Лінда і Глорія зустрінуться на заняттях.

Exercise 8.

Look at the notes. Complete the story about Gloria.

Look for Camble Hall – meet Linda – know where Camble Hall is – go
together – talk – student – interested in business administration –
teacher of English – test of English – from Venesuella – grate English –
hope to see again.

Exercise 9.

Match the parts of the sentences:

Could you tell me where

Are you taking an

Linda is going

What do you want

Are you from

Maybe I will be

I am from in your class.

to study?

South America?

To be an English teacher.

Camble Hall is?

English placement test?

Venesuella.

Exercise 10.

Turn the dialogue from Direct into Reported speech.

Conclusion

Listening to English, or any other foreign language that is being
learner in my view plays a key part in its study.

Definitely, written speech is also an important element of the language
studying pracess, however oral speech prevails in daily communication in
our everyday life. To my mind listening (of texts, dialogs, radio and TV
programs) is the main way of picking up some colloquial language.

The decisive part of listening for interpersonal communication and for
language study, as the mean of exchange of information, may be explained
by several reasons.

Firstly, it is generally known that ubsolutely the best method to sudy
foreign language is in the language environment, simply speaking, while
being surrounded by native speakers (those who speak some language since
their birth) and talking to them as much as possible.

Of course not everybody, who would like to study languages has a
possibility to go abroad, or to communicate with English speaking person
in Ukraine.

Without prejudice to the importance grammatical rules or vocabulary
nevertheless I would like to point out that listening is undoubtly the
best way to create the effect of language environment and thus do use
the advantages of the best way to study foreign language.

While listening to the sound of foreign language it is not only
possible, but also desirable to polish apprehension of the text by ear.
At the same time one can use listening to improve vocabulary or even to
learn some modern grammar trends.

Not to mention that listening is the only possibility to make your
promenciation correct, whide is a real jewel of every speaker. On the
contrary bad pronunciation may cause misunderstanding or ever mockery.

Listening is useful to everyone beginners and professionals with perfect
commad of English as well to kup themselves in shape”.

Some specialists in languages believe that each language is like music –
the main thing is to feel the melody, the rithm of speech, intonation of
the word and sentence. All this can be porcieved only by car, namely by
listening.

I would be glad to practice listening in future, in order to increase
comprehension and fluency of English is general.

Word families

1. teacher – вчитель.

teach – вчити

teaching – навчання

teachable – здатний до навчання

2. speak – говорити, розвомляти

speaker – оратор

speaking – що говорить, розмова

3. test – 1) іспит; перевіряти

2) щиток, черепашка,

tester – особа що здає іспит

testamur – посвідчення про складання університетського іспиту

testate – що залишив по смерті заповіт

testator – заповідач

testamentary – заповідальний

4. class – 1) суспільний клас; 2) клас, група;

3) класний; 4) класифікувати;

class-book – підручник,

class-consiousness – класова свідомість;

class-fellow – однокласник

classic – класичний, зразковий

classicism — класицизм

classification – класифікація

5. examination – іспит, огляд, допит

examinant – екзаменатор

examinational – екзаменаційний

examinatorial – екзаменаторський

examine – розглядати, досліджувати

examiner – екзаменатор

6. business – справа, професія, комерційна діяльність

business – зайнятість, діловитість,

business-like – діловий, практичний

business man – ділова людина

business manager – керівник справами

7. listen – слухати, слухатися

listener – слухач

listener-in – радіослухач

listening – слухання

listening-in – слухання по радіо

8. foreign – іноземний, чужий

foreign-born – що народився в іншій країні

foreigner – іноземець, чужа людина

9. conversation – розмова, переговори

conversational – розмовний, балакучий

conversazione – вечір, що влаштовується інтелігенцією

converse – розмовляти

converse – розмова, бесіда

10. college — коледж

colleger = collegian – член коледжу

collegiate – 1) колегіальний

2) студент коледжу

1. conversation, chat, colloquy, communication, communion, conference,
dialogue, discourse, discussion, intercourse, interview, palaver,
parley, talk.

2. teach, advise, coach, direct, educate, enlightem, explain, expound,
guide, imbue, inculcate, indoctrinate, inform, instill, instruct,
interpret, lecture, nurture, prepare, school, train, tutor.

Ant. – follow, imbibe, learn, misguide, misinform.

3. examination, analysis, audit, check-up, exploration, inquire,
inguisition, inspection, interrogation, investigation, probing, query,
quest, questioning, quiz, research, scrutiny, search, test, trial,
review.

Ant. – disregard, inaftention, negligence.

4. speak, announce, articulate, chatter, communicate, converse, debate,
declaim, declare, discourse, discuss, express, proclaim, pronounce,
report, say, talk, tell, utter, vocalize, voice.

5. class, caste, category, denomination, division, genus, group, kind,
degree, grade, order, rank, set, standing, elegance, excellence.

6. business, art, commerce, concern, duty, employment, enpagement,
enterprise, job, occupation, profession, pursuit, trade, vocation, work.

Ant. – avocation, hobby.

7. test, assay, examine, experiment, inspect, prove, scrutinize,
substantiate, try, verify, criterion, demonstration, essay, examination,
warrant, witness.

8. skillful, able, accomplished, adept, adroit, apt, capable, clever,
competent, cunning, deft, dexterous, efficient, expert, handly,
ingenious, masterful, practiced, proficient, ready, skilled, talented,
trained, versed.

Ant. – awkward, bludjeriny, clumsy, inept, inexperienced.

9. foreign, alien, distant, extraneous, far, remote, strange,
unucceustomed, unknown, unnaturual.

Ant. – accustomed, familiar, indigenous, known.

10. listen, attend to, audit, hear, hearken, need, list, monitor,
overhear, follow, grant, obey, observe.

Ant. – disregard, ignore, reject, scorn.

Definitions

1. test – an examination of the nature or value of anything; the method
used in making such an examination; s standard by which a thing’s
qualities are tried; a set of knowledge, abilities, aptitudes or
character are assessed; a set of circumstances, occurring naturally or
deliberately contrived, in which the nature ir qualities of a person or
thing are revealed.

2. teacher – a person who teaches, esp. for a living.

3. conversation – talk, esp. informal and friendly; good talk practiced
as an art; exploratory discussion of an issue by diplomats of different
countries or by officials of institutions.

4. class – a group of people of the same rank or status in a community;
the concept or system of social divisions; a division by cost; a group
of students taught together; the period when they meet; a course of
instruction; the year of graduation from school or college.

5. business – one’s regular employment, profession, occupation; one’s
personal affair; something requiring attention; a situation, matter; the
activity of buying and selling, trade.

6. examination – an inspection; a considering; a questioning; a testing
of knowledge or capabilities.

7. foreign – not of one’s own country or race; coming from or typical of
some country outside one’s own country or race; coming from or typical
of some country outside one’s own; having to do with other countries.

8. listen – to use one’s ears consciously in order to hear; to pay
attention in order to hear; to pay attention to speech, music; to be
influenced by.

«Англо-український словник».

Mare Helgesen and Steven Brown “Active Listening”. Cambridge. University
Press.

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